cybersecurity

shutterstock_696222376-300x200.jpg

Are Cash Transfer Apps Safe to Use? Here’s What Your Family Needs to Know

Are Cash Transfer Apps Safe to Use? Here’s What Your Family Needs to Know

cash appsI can’t recall the last time I gave my teenage daughter cash for anything. If she needs money for gas, I Venmo it. A Taco Bell study break with the roommates? No problem. With one click, I transfer money from my Venmo account to hers. She uses a Venmo credit card to make her purchase. To this mom, cash apps may be the best thing to happen to parenting since location tracking became possible. But as convenient as these apps may be, are they safe for your family to use?

How do they work?

The research company, eMarketer, estimates that 96.0 million people used Peer-to-Peer (P2P) payment services this year (that’s 40.4% of all mobile phone users), up from an estimated 82.5 million last year.

P2P technology allows you to create a profile on a transfer app and link your bank account or credit card to it. Once your banking information is set up, you can locate another person’s account on the app (or invite someone to the app) and transfer funds instantly into their P2P account (without the hassle of getting a bank account number, email, or phone number). That person can leave the money in their app account, move it into his or her bank account, or use a debit card issued by the P2P app to use the funds immediately. If the app offers a credit card (like Venmo does), the recipient can use the Venmo card like a credit card at retailers most anywhere. 

Some of the more popular P2P apps include Venmo, Cash App, Zelle, Apple Pay, Google Wallet, PayPal.me, Facebook Messenger, and Snapcash, among others. Because of the P2P platform’s rapid growth, more and more investors are entering the market each day to introduce new cash apps, which is causing many analysts to speculate on need for paper check transactions in the future.

Are they safe?

While sending your hard-earned money back and forth through cyberspace on an app doesn’t sound safe, in general, it is. Are there some exceptions? Always. 

Online scam trends often follow consumer purchasing trends and, right now, the hot transaction spot is P2P platforms. Because P2P money is transferred instantly (and irreversibly), scammers exploit this and are figuring out how to take people’s money. After getting a P2P payment, scammers then delete their accounts and disappear — instantly

In 2018 Consumer Reports (CR) compared the potential financial and privacy risks of five mobile P2P services with a focus on payment authentication and data privacy. CR found all the apps had acceptable encryption but some were dinged for not clearly explaining how they protected user data. The consumer advocacy group ranked app safety strength in this order: Apple Pay, Venmo, Cash App, Facebook Messenger, and Zelle. CR also noted they “found nothing to suggest that using these products would threaten the security of your financial and personal data.”

While any app’s architecture may be deemed safe, no app user is immune from scams, which is where app safety can make every difference. If your family uses P2P apps regularly, confirm each user understands the potential risks. Here are just a few of the schemes that have been connected to P2P apps.

cash apps

Potential scams

Fraudulent sellers. This scam targets an unassuming buyer who sends money through a P2P app to purchase an item from someone they met online. The friendly seller casually suggests the buyer “just Venmo or Cash App me.” The buyer sends the money, but the item is never received, and the seller vanishes. This scam has been known to happen in online marketplaces and other trading sites and apps.

Malicious emails. Another scam is sending people an email telling them that someone has deposited money in their P2P account. They are prompted to click a link to go directly to the app, but instead, the malicious link downloads malware onto the person’s phone or computer. The scammer can then glean personal information from the person’s devices. To avoid a malware attack, consider installing comprehensive security software on your family’s computers and devices.

Ticket scams. Beware of anyone selling concert or sporting event tickets online. Buyers can get caught up in the excitement of scoring tickets for their favorite events, send the money via a P2P app, but the seller leaves them empty-handed.

Puppy and romance scams. In this cruel scam, a pet lover falls in love with a photo of a puppy online, uses a P2P app to pay for it, and the seller deletes his or her account and disappears. Likewise, catfish scammers gain someone’s trust. As the romantic relationship grows, the fraudulent person eventually asks to borrow money. The victim sends money using a P2P app only to have their love interest end all communication and vanish.  

P2P safety: Talking points for families

Only connect with family and friends. When using cash apps, only exchange money with people you know. Unlike an insured bank, P2P apps do not refund the money you’ve paid out accidentally or in a scam scenario. P2P apps hold users 100% responsible for transfers. 

Verify details of each transfer. The sender is responsible for funds, even in the case of an accidental transfer. So, if you are paying Joe Smith your half of the rent, be sure you select the correct Joe Smith, (not Joe Smith_1, or Joe Smithe) before you hit send. There could be dozens of name variations to choose from in an app’s directory. Also, verify with your bank that each P2P transaction registers.

Avoid public Wi-Fi transfers. Public Wi-Fi is susceptible to hackers trying to access valuable financial and personal information. For this reason, only use a secure, private Wi-Fi network when using a P2P payment app. If you must use public Wi-Fi, consider using a Virtual Private Network (VPN).

cash apps

Don’t use P2P apps for business. P2P apps are designed to be used between friends and include no-commercial-use clauses in their policies. For larger business transactions such as buying and selling goods or services use apps like PayPal. 

Lock your app. When you have a P2P app on your phone, it’s like carrying cash. If someone steals your phone, they can go into an unlocked P2P app and send themselves money from your bank account. Set up extra security on your app. Most apps offer PINs, fingerprint IDs, and two-factor authentication. Also, always lock your device home screen.

Adjust privacy settings. Venmo includes a feed that auto shares when users exchange funds, much like a social media feed. To avoid a stranger seeing that you paid a friend for Ed Sheeran tickets (and won’t be home that night), be sure to adjust your privacy settings. 

Read disclosures. One way to assess an app’s safety is to read its disclosures. How does the app protect your privacy and security? How does the app use your data? What is the app’s error-resolution policy? Feel secure with the app you choose.

We’ve learned that the most significant factor in determining an app’s safety comes back to the person using it. If your family loves using P2P apps, be sure to take the time to discuss the responsibility that comes with exchanging cash through apps. 

The post Are Cash Transfer Apps Safe to Use? Here’s What Your Family Needs to Know appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

twitter40-300x169-3.jpg

Millions of Car Buyer Records Exposed: How to Bring This Breach to a Halt

Millions of Car Buyer Records Exposed: How to Bring This Breach to a Halt

Buying a car can be quite a process and requires a lot of time, energy, and research. What most potential car buyers don’t expect is to have their data exposed for all to see. But according to Threatpost, this story rings true for many prospective buyers. Over 198 million records containing personal, loan, and financial information on prospective car buyers were recently leaked due to a database that was left without password protection.

The database belonged to Dealer Leads, a company that gathers information on prospective buyers through a network of targeted websites. These targeted websites provide car-buying research information and classified ads for visitors, allowing Dealer Leads to collect this information and send it to franchise and independent car dealerships to be used as sales leads. The information collected included records with names, email addresses, phone numbers, physical addresses, IP addresses, and other sensitive or personally identifiable information – 413GB worth of this data, to be exact. What’s more, the exposed database contained ports, pathways, and storage info that cybercriminals could exploit to access Dealer Lead’s deeper digital network.

Millions of Car Buyer Records Exposed: How to Bring This Breach to a Halt

Although the database has been closed off to the public, it is unclear how long it was left exposed. And while it’s crucial for organizations to hold data privacy to the utmost importance, there are plenty of things users can do to help safeguard their data. Check out the following tips to help you stay secure:

  • Be vigilant about checking your accounts. If you suspect that your data has been compromised, frequently check your accounts for unusual activity. This will help you stop fraudulent activity in its tracks.
  • Place a fraud alert. If you suspect that your data might have been compromised, place a fraud alert on your credit. This not only ensures that any new or recent requests undergo scrutiny, but also allows you to have extra copies of your credit report so you can check for suspicious activity.
  • Consider using identity theft protection. A solution like McAfee Identify Theft Protection will help you to monitor your accounts and alert you of any suspicious activity.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Millions of Car Buyer Records Exposed: How to Bring This Breach to a Halt appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

img_1596040370943472-300x225.jpg

Iron Man’s Instagram Hacked: Snap Away Cybercriminals With These Social Media Tips

Iron Man’s Instagram Hacked: Snap Away Cybercriminals With These Social Media Tips

Celebrities: they’re just like us! Well, at least in the sense that they still face common cyberthreats. This week, “Avengers: Endgame” actor Robert Downey Jr. was added to the list of celebrities whose social media accounts have been compromised. According to Bleeping Computer, a hacker group managed to take control of the actor’s Instagram account, sharing enticing but phony giveaway announcements.

Iron Man’s Instagram Hacked: Snap Away Cybercriminals With These Social Media Tips

The offers posted by the hackers included 2,000 iPhone XS devices, MacBook Pro laptops, Tesla cars, and more. In addition to the giveaways added to the actor’s story page, the hackers also changed the link in his account bio, pointing followers to a survey page designed to collect their personal information that could be used for other scams. The tricky part? The hackers posted the link using the URL shortening service Bitly, preventing followers from noticing any clues as to whether the link was malicious or not.

This incident serves as a reminder that anyone with an online account can be vulnerable to a cyberattack, whether you have superpowers or not. In fact, over 22% of internet users reported that their online accounts have been hacked at least once, and more than 14% said that they were hacked more than once. Luckily, there are some best practices you can follow to help keep your accounts safe and sound:

  • Don’t interact with suspicious messages, links, or posts. If you come across posts with offers that seem too good to be true, they probably are. Use your best judgment and don’t click on suspicious messages or links, even if they appear to be posted by a friend.
  • Alert the platform. Flag any scam posts or messages you encounter on social media to the platform so they can stop the threat from spreading.
  • Use good password hygiene. Make sure all of your passwords are strong and unique.
  • Don’t post personal information. Posting personally identifiable information on social media could potentially allow a hacker to guess answers to your security questions or make you an easier target for a cyberattack. Keep your personal information under wraps and turn your account to private.

To stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Iron Man’s Instagram Hacked: Snap Away Cybercriminals With These Social Media Tips appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

McAfee_consumer_1female1child_smartphone_cafe_72dpi-300x200.jpg

Attention Facebook Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Recent Breach

Attention Facebook Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Recent Breach

With over 2.4 billion monthly active users, Facebook is the biggest social network worldwide. And with so many users come tons of data, including some personal information that may now potentially be exposed. According to TechCrunch, a security researcher found an online database exposing 419 million user phone numbers linked to Facebook accounts.

It appears that the exposed server wasn’t password-protected, meaning that anyone with internet access could find the database. This server held records containing a user’s unique Facebook ID and the phone number associated with the account. In some cases, records also revealed the user’s name, gender, and location by country. TechCrunch was able to verify several records in the database by matching a known Facebook user’s phone number with their listed Facebook ID. Additionally, TechCrunch was able to match some phone numbers against Facebook’s password reset feature, which partially reveals a user’s phone number linked to their account.

Attention Facebook Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Recent Breach

It’s been over a year since Facebook restricted public access to users’ phone numbers. And although the owner of the database wasn’t found, it was pulled offline after the web host was contacted. Even though there has been no evidence that the Facebook accounts were compromised as a result of this breach, it’s important for users to do everything they can to protect their data. Here are some tips to keep in your cybersecurity arsenal:

  • Change your password. Most people will rotate between the same three passwords for all of their accounts. While this makes it easier to remember your credentials, it also makes it easier for hackers to access more than one of your accounts. Try using a unique password for every one of your accounts or employ a password manager.
  • Enable two-factor authentication. While a strong and unique password is a good first line of defense, enabling app-based two-factor authentication across your accounts will help your cause by providing an added layer of security.

And, of course, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Attention Facebook Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Recent Breach appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

twitter61-300x169.jpg

iPhone Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Latest iOS Hacks

iPhone Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Latest iOS Hacks

iPhone hacks have often been considered by some to be a rare occurrence. However, a group of Google researchers recently discovered that someone has been exploiting multiple iPhone vulnerabilities for the last two years. How? Simply by getting users to visit a website.

How exactly does this exploitation campaign work? According to WIRED, researchers revealed a handful of websites that had assembled five exploit chains. These exploit chains are tools that link security vulnerabilities together and allow a hacker to penetrate each layer of iOS digital protections. This campaign took advantage of 14 security flaws, resulting in the attacker gaining complete control over a user’s phone. Researchers state that these malicious sites were programmed to assess the Apple devices that loaded them and compromise the devices with powerful monitoring malware if possible. Once the malware was installed, it could monitor live location data, grab photos, contacts, passwords, or other sensitive information from the iOS Keychain.

So, what makes this attack unique? For starters, this exploitation campaign hides in plain sight, uploading information without any encryption. If a user monitored their network traffic, they would notice activity as their data was being uploaded to the hacker’s server. Additionally, a user would be able to see suspicious activity if they connected their device to their computer and reviewed console logs. Console logs show the codes for the programs being run on the device. However, since this method would require a user to take the extra step of plugging their iPhone into a computer, it’s highly unlikely that they would notice the suspicious activity.

iPhone Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Latest iOS Hacks

Although iOS exploits usually require a variety of complexities to be successful, this exploitation campaign proves that iOS hacking is very much alive and kicking. So, what can Apple users do to help ward off these kinds of attacks? Here’s how you can help keep your device secure:

  • Install automatic updates. In your device settings, choose to have automatic updates installed on your device. This will ensure that you have the latest security patches for vulnerabilities like the ones leveraged in these exploit chains as soon as they’re available.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post iPhone Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Latest iOS Hacks appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

twitter48-300x169.jpg

Introduction to “Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?” a book by Gary Davis

Introduction to “Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?” a book by Gary Davis

“Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?” explores the modern implications of our human nature: our inherent inclination to share our experiences, specifically on the internet. Our increasing reliance on technology to connect with others has us sharing far more information about ourselves than we realize, and without a full understanding of the risks involved.

While we’re posting innocent poolside pictures, we’re also creating a collection of highly personal information. And not just on social media. It happens by simply going about our day. Whether it is the computers we use for work and play, the smartphones that are nearly always within arm’s reach, or the digital assistants that field household requests—all of these devices capture and share data about our habits, our interests, and even our comings and goings. Yet we largely don’t know it’s happening—or, for that matter, with whom we’re sharing this information, and to what end.

I wrote this book for anyone who wants to live online as safely and privately as possible, for the sake of themselves and their family. And that should be plenty of us. With news of data breaches, companies sharing our personal information without our knowledge, and cybercrime robbing the global economy of an estimated $600 billion a year, it’s easy to feel helpless. But we’re not. There are things we can do. It’s time to understand how we’re creating all this personal information so we can control its flow, and who has access to it. The book takes an even-handed look at the most prevalent privacy and security challenges facing individuals and families today. It skips the scare tactics that can dominate the topic, and illustrates the steps each of us can take to lead more private and secure lives in an increasingly connected world.

The notion that binds the book together is the idea of a personal data lake. “Data lake” is a widely used term in business to reflect a large repository of data that companies collect and store. In the book I explore how we create personal data lakes as we go about our digital lives. I explore how our data lakes fill as we do more and more activities online, and offer insights that can be used to protect our personal data lakes, so that we can live more privately and enjoy safe online experiences.

This book is for people in families of any size or structure. It looks at security and privacy across the stages of life, and explores the roles each of us play in those stages, from birth to the time we eventually leave a digital legacy behind, along with important milestones and transitional periods in between. You’ll see how security and privacy are pertinent at every step of your digital journey, and how specific age groups have concerns that are often unique to that stage of life. The structure allows you to easily navigate to the chapters and sections that most relate to the life stage you are in, and offers guidance.

This book, like most things in life, is about choice. You can choose to roll the dice and hope that you’re not one of the hundreds of millions who are victims each year of phishing scams, ransomware attacks, and identity theft, or among the handful of people who still fall for the Nigerian prince lottery scam. You can also choose to use your computers, tablets, smartphones, and personal assistants as you have been, letting companies grift all kinds of personal information from you, without your knowledge or consent. Or you can choose to embrace the guidelines outlined in the book and make it extremely more difficult for a bad actor or cybercriminal to make you or your loved ones a victim.

Gary Davis’ book, Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?, is available September 5, 2019 and can be ordered at amazon.com.

The post Introduction to “Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?” a book by Gary Davis appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

shutterstock_397853056-300x200.jpg

7 Questions to Ask Your Child’s School About Cybersecurity Protocols

7 Questions to Ask Your Child’s School About Cybersecurity Protocols

7 Questions to Ask Your Child’s School About Cybersecurity ProtocolsJust a few weeks into the new school year and, already, reports of malicious cyberattacks in schools have hit the headlines. While you’ve made digital security strides in your home, what concerns if any should you have about your child’s data being compromised at school?

There’s a long and short answer to that question. The short answer is don’t lose sleep (it’s out of your control) but get clarity and peace of mind by asking your school officials the right questions. 

The long answer is that cybercriminals have schools in their digital crosshairs. According to a recent report in The Hill, school districts are becoming top targets of malicious attacks, and government entities are scrambling to fight back. These attacks are costing school districts (taxpayers) serious dollars and costing kids (and parents) their privacy.


Prime Targets

According to one report, a U.S. school district becomes the victim of cyberattack as often as every three days. The reason for this is that cybercriminals want clean data to exploit for dozens of nefarious purposes. The best place to harvest pure data is schools where social security numbers are usually unblemished and go unchecked for years. At the same time, student data can be collected and sold on the dark web. Data at risk include vaccination records, birthdates, addresses, phone numbers, and contacts used for identity theft. 

Top three cyberthreats

7 Questions to Ask Your Child’s School About Cybersecurity Protocols

The top three threats against schools are data breaches, phishing scams, and ransomware. Data breaches can happen through phishing scams and malware attacks that could include malicious email links or fake accounts posing as acquaintances. In a ransomware attack, a hacker locks down a school’s digital network and holds data for a ransom. 

Over the past month, hackers have hit K-12 schools in New Jersey, New York, Wisconsin, Virginia, Oklahoma, Connecticut, and Louisiana. Universities are also targeted.

In the schools impacted, criminals were able to find loopholes in their security protocols. A loophole can be an unprotected device, a printer, or a malicious email link opened by a new employee. It can even be a calculated scam like the Virginia school duped into paying a fraudulent vendor $600,000 for a football field. The cybercrime scenarios are endless. 

7 key questions to ask

  1. Does the school have a data security and privacy policy in place as well as cyberattack response plan?
  2. Does the school have a system to educate staff, parents, and students about potential risks and safety protocols? 
  3. Does the school have a data protection officer on staff responsible for implementing security and privacy policies?
  4. Does the school have reputable third-party vendors to ensure the proper technology is in place to secure staff and student data?
  5. Are data security and student privacy a fundamental part of onboarding new school employees?
  6. Does the school create backups of valuable information and store them separately from the central server to protect against ransomware attacks?
  7. Does the school have any new technology initiatives planned? If so, how will it address student data protection?

The majority of schools are far from negligent. Leaders know the risks, and many have put recognized cybersecurity frameworks in place. Also, schools have the pressing challenge of 1) providing a technology-driven education to students while at the same time, 2) protecting student/staff privacy and 3) finding funds to address the escalating risk.

Families can add a layer of protection to a child’s data while at school by making sure devices are protected in a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) setting. Cybersecurity is a shared responsibility. While schools work hard to implement safeguards, be sure you are taking responsibility in your digital life and equipping your kids to do the same. 

 

The post 7 Questions to Ask Your Child’s School About Cybersecurity Protocols appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

twitter29-300x169.jpg

14 Million Customers Affected By Hostinger Breach: How to Secure Your Data

14 Million Customers Affected By Hostinger Breach: How to Secure Your Data

Whether you’re a small business owner or a blogger, having an accessible website is a must. That’s why many users look to web hosting companies so they can store the files necessary for their websites to function properly. One such company is Hostinger. This popular web, cloud, and virtual private server hosting provider and domain registrar boasts over 29 million users. But according to TechCrunch, the company recently disclosed that it detected unauthorized access to a database containing information on 14 million customers.

Let’s dive into the details of this breach. Hostinger received an alert on Friday that a server had been accessed by an unauthorized third party. The server contained an authorization token allowing the alleged hacker to obtain further access and escalate privileges to the company’s systems, including an API (application programming interface) database. An API database defines the rules for interacting with a particular web server for a specific use. In this case, the API server that was breached was used to query the details about clients and their accounts. The database included non-financial information including customer usernames, email addresses, hashed passwords, first names, and IP addresses.

Since the breach, Hostinger stated that it has identified the origin of the unauthorized access and the vulnerable system has since been secured. As a precaution, the company reset all user passwords and is in contact with respective authorities to further investigate the situation.

14 Million Customers Affected By Hostinger Breach: How to Secure Your Data

Although no financial data was exposed in this breach, it’s possible that cybercriminals can use the data from the exposed server to carry out several other malicious schemes. To protect your data from these cyberattacks, check out the following tips:

  • Be vigilant about checking your accounts. If you suspect that your data has been compromised, frequently check your accounts for unusual activity. This will help you stop fraudulent activity in its tracks.
  • Reset your password. Even if your password wasn’t automatically reset by Hostinger, update your credentials as a precautionary measure.
  • Practice good password hygiene. A cybercriminal can crack hashed passwords, such as the ones exposed in this breach, and use the information to access other accounts using the same password. To avoid this, make sure to create a strong, unique password for each of your online accounts.

And, as always, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post 14 Million Customers Affected By Hostinger Breach: How to Secure Your Data appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

ellen-300x173.png

Ellen DeGeneres Instagram Hack: What You Can Do to Protect Your Account

Today was not an easy morning for Ellen DeGeneres. She woke to find that her Instagram account was briefly hacked according to the talk show host’s twitter and Yahoo Entertainment. A series of giveaways offering free Tesla cars, Mac Books, and more, were posted to the talk show host’s account last night. After seeing the posts, some of her followers became skeptical and warned her of the suspicious behavior. They were smart to flag the giveaways as untrustworthy because DeGeneres confirmed that her Instagram was in fact infected by malicious activity.

Ellen DeGeneres Instagram Hack: What You Can Do to Protect Your Account

While Ellen joked about “password” not being the most secure password, it’s always a best practice to use strong passwords that differ from each of your other accounts to avoid easy break-ins from cybercriminals.

One of the central reasons hackers target social media accounts is to retrieve stored personal information. Once cybercriminals log in to an account, they have access to everything that has ever been shared with the platform, such as date of birth, email, hometown, and security questions. They then could potentially use this information to try to log in to other accounts or even steal the person’s identity, depending on the level of information they have access to.

Another motive for infecting a user’s social media account is to spread phishing scams or malware amongst your network. In DeGeneres’ case, her 76 million Instagram followers were prompted to click on links that were scams in disguise of giveaways so hackers could steal their personal information. In other cases, hackers will use adware so they can profit off clicks and gain access to even more valuable information from you and your contacts. Sometimes these cybercriminals will post publicly on your behalf to reach your entire network, and other times they will read through private messages and communicate with your close network directly.

It’s not just celebrities that are vulnerable to cybercriminals. In fact, over 22% of internet users reported that their online accounts have been hacked at least once, and more than 14% said that they were hacked more than once. If your account gets hacked, the first step is to change your password right away and notify your network, so they don’t click on any specious links.

The good news is that by taking proper precautions, you can significantly reduce risk to help keep your account safe. Here are five best practices for protecting your social media accounts from malicious activity:

  • Use your best judgment and don’t click on suspicious messages or links, even if they appear to be posted by a friend.
  • Flag any scam posts or messages you encounter on social media to the platform, so they can help stop the threat from spreading.
  • Use unique, complicated passwords for all your accounts.
  • Avoid posting any identifying information or personal details that might allow a hacker to guess your security questions.
  • Always use comprehensive security software that can keep you protected from the latest threats.

Looking for more mobile security tips and trends? Be sure to follow @McAfee Home on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

The post Ellen DeGeneres Instagram Hack: What You Can Do to Protect Your Account appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

vox-messenger-secure-corpLogo-60x60

End-2-End Encrypted. Secure. Ad-Free.
Lightweight and Faster than the Competition.

Vox Messenger is a secure alternative to other popular chat messenger apps.

Available for Free. Whitelabel Corporate Edition Coming Soon.

All Rights Reserved - Copyright @ 2018 - Vox Messenger (a Division of Kryotech Ltd.)