data protection

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Here’s What You Need to Know About Your Data Privacy in 2020

Here’s What You Need to Know About Your Data Privacy in 2020 1

The end of 2019 is rapidly approaching, and with the coming of a new year comes the perfect opportunity to reflect on the past and plan for the months ahead. What will 2020 bring when it comes to cybersecurity and what can users do to ensure that they’re protected in the upcoming year? From new data privacy laws to how organizations collect and store user data, the new year will certainly bring plenty of security implications for users. Let’s take a look at a few predictions we have for the year to come.

More Awareness, More Regulations

After a security breach is disclosed, users often learn what can go wrong with their data and may start to wonder what will happen if their information gets into the wrong hands. That’s why new privacy laws will likely be implemented to empower users to better protect and control their data. For example, the new California privacy law set to go into effect January 2020 will allow consumers to instruct companies to delete their personal information and to opt-out of having their private data shared. These new regulations will allow users to better control their data and who has access to it. However, more regulations also create a more complicated landscape for individuals to navigate. Consumers will likely see more “consent” requests attached to any online data collection. That said, it is important to pay close attention to what consumers are agreeing to when they click “consent.”

With these new privacy laws, the method and level of transparency that organizations use to collect and store user data will likely come under scrutiny, particularly as data breaches become public. For example, companies make billions of dollars annually by buying and selling personal information that isn’t theirs to sell. The more data a company has on a user, the more insight cybercriminals have to infiltrate their digital life and trick them into sharing more information. 

New Tricks for the New Year

As more data is collected from various breaches, cybercriminals will look to leverage this information as a way to better understand which users to target and how exactly to target them. With the help of social engineering and artificial intelligence, these crooks will up the ante and turn old cyber tricks into sophisticated, unfamiliar threats. Take call spoofing, for example. By taking advantage of a user’s private data and new technology, cybercriminals could implement a fake call that appears to be coming from the user’s friend or family member. Because users are more likely to pick up a call from someone they know or a number that shares their same area code, cybercriminals increase the chances that their malicious attacks will be successful.

Dark Web Draws in More Data

With the number of breached records growing every day, users need to be aware of how crooks are leveraging this information in the cybercriminal underground and on the Dark Web. According to the McAfee Advanced Threat Research (ATR) team, more than 2.2 billion stolen account credentials were made available on the cybercriminal underground throughout Q1 2019 alone. This growing trend of personal online accounts being brokered on the Dark Web and the increasingly sophisticated threats that have recently emerged means that the 2019 holiday season could be the most dangerous yet.

With these predictions for the cybersecurity landscape in 2020, what resolutions can users make to help ensure that their data is protected? Follow these security tips to help safeguard your personal information:

  • Never reuse passwords. With just one hack, cybercriminals can get their hands on thousands of passwords, which they can then use to try to access multiple accounts. Ensure that all of your passwords are complex and unique.
  • Go directly to the source. Instead of clicking on a link in an email, it’s always best to check directly with the source to verify an offer or shipment.
  • Browse with security protection. Use a comprehensive security solution, like McAfee Total Protection, which can help protect devices against malware, phishing attacks, and other threats. It includes McAfee WebAdvisor, which can help identify malicious websites.
  • Use a tool to help protect your personal information. A solution like McAfee Identity Theft Protection takes a proactive approach to help protect identities with personal and financial monitoring and recovery tools to help keep identities personal and secure.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Here’s What You Need to Know About Your Data Privacy in 2020 appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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Beat Black Friday Scammers: Secure Your Online Purchases From Fake Payment Processors

Beat Black Friday Scammers: Secure Your Online Purchases From Fake Payment Processors 2

They see you when you’re shopping, they know when you click “pay” – cybercriminals, that is. With Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals flooding the internet, malicious actors have many opportunities to exploit users rushing to purchase gifts for family and friends. And according to Ars Technica, thieves have devised a new way to steal payment-card data from online shoppers, just in time for the holiday shopping season.

So, what makes this particular scam different from other credit and debit card scams? Many e-commerce sites will choose to offload payment card charges to third-party payment service platforms, or PSPs. However, cybercriminals have developed fake payment service platforms that highly resemble legitimate PSPs. Rather than infecting a merchant’s checkout page with malware that skims the information after it’s been inputted by the user, cybercriminals infect the merchant site by adding a line or two of code, which redirects the user to a fake PSP at the time of purchase.

Beat Black Friday Scammers: Secure Your Online Purchases From Fake Payment Processors 3
Image provided by Ares Technica.

What makes this scam so stealthy? Apart from swapping legitimate payment processing sites with fraudulent ones, cybercriminals closely mimic the traits of real e-banking pages to further trick the user into believing that their purchase is secure. For example, the fake payment processing page checks all the fields once the user completes them or informs the user if the field is invalid. Once the fake PSP collects the data, it redirects the unsuspecting user to the legitimate PSP and includes the purchase amount after successfully stealing the victim’s information.

Payment-service platforms are common in the world of e-commerce, particularly for smaller websites that don’t have the resources to harden their servers against sophisticated attacks. As a result, users need to be on high alert for these malicious schemes. Check out the following tips to help prevent your data from being swiped by cybercriminals.

  • Be on the lookout for suspicious activity. This particular scam redirects users from the fake PSP back to the legitimate payment site after their information has already been accepted. If you’re being asked for personal or financial data more than once, the site has likely been infected with malicious code.
  • Review your accounts. Be sure to look over your credit card and banking statements and report any suspicious activity as soon as possible.
  • Place a fraud alert. If you suspect that your data might have been compromised, place a fraud alert on your credit. This not only ensures that any new or recent requests undergo scrutiny, but also allows you to have extra copies of your credit report so you can check for suspicious activity.
  • Use a comprehensive security solution. Safeguard yourself from cybercriminals with a comprehensive security solution like McAfee Total Protection, which can help protect you from malware, phishing, and other threats.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

 

The post Beat Black Friday Scammers: Secure Your Online Purchases From Fake Payment Processors appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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2.2 Million Users Affected By Latest Data Exposure: 4 Tips to Stay Secure

2.2 Million Users Affected By Latest Data Exposure: 4 Tips to Stay Secure 4

The digitalization of data allows it to move effortlessly and be accessed from devices and places around the world within a matter of seconds. This also makes it possible for businesses, organizations, and even individuals to collect and analyze this data for a variety of reasons. However, not all of these purposes are well-intentioned. More often than not, cybercriminals use the abundance of digital data to their advantage. According to Ars Technica and security researcher Troy Hunt, password data and other personal information belonging to as many as 2.2 million users of two websites – a cryptocurrency wallet service and a gaming bot provider — has been posted on the Dark Web.

What information is included in these databases? The first data haul includes personal information for as many as 1.4 million accounts from the GateHub cryptocurrency wallet service. The cybercriminal who posted this 3.72GB database stated that it also includes two-factor authentication keys, mnemonic phrases, and wallet hashes. The second haul contains data for about 800,000 accounts on RuneScape’s bot provider EpicBot, including usernames and IP addresses. Both databases include registered email addresses and hashed passwords.

So, what lessons can we learn from this data dump and what can we do to help secure our information? Check out the following security tips to help protect your digital data.

  • Be vigilant when monitoring your personal and financial data. A good way to determine whether your data has been exposed or compromised is to closely monitor your online accounts. If you see anything fishy, take extra precautions by updating your privacy settings, changing your password, or using two-factor authentication.
  • Use strong, unique passwords. Make sure to use complex passwords for each of your accounts, and never reuse your credentials across different platforms. It’s also a good idea to update your passwords consistently to further protect your data.
  • Watch out for other cyberattacks. Be on high alert for other malicious attacks where cybercriminals could use stolen credentials to exploit users, such as spear phishing.
  • Check to see if you’ve been affected. If you or someone you know has a GateHub or EpicBot account, use this tool to check if you could have been potentially affected.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post 2.2 Million Users Affected By Latest Data Exposure: 4 Tips to Stay Secure appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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This Holiday Season, Watch Out for These Cyber-Grinch Tricks

This Holiday Season, Watch Out for These Cyber-Grinch Tricks 5

Whether it be that their shoes are too tight, their heads aren’t screwed on just right, or they’re expressing a little bit of “Bah Humbug,” cyber-grinches and cyber-scrooges everywhere view the holiday season as a perfect opportunity to exploit users. In fact, McAfee recently conducted a survey of over 1,000 adults over the age of 18 in the U.S. from October 10-20, 2019 to shed light on the types of scams they encountered this year. Let’s take a look at how criminals are attempting to steal the fun of the holiday season with various scams.

Ribbons, Wrappings, and Robocalls

The survey revealed that 48% of Americans have been a victim of or know someone who has been a victim of robocalling in 2019, making it the most prevalent scam of the year. Respondents also reported that they had been targeted with email phishing (41%) and text phishing (35%) in 2019. Another popular trend this year among these crooks? What’s old is new again. While cybercriminal activity has become increasingly sophisticated over the years, survey results showed that these less sophisticated scams of Christmas are still a popular avenue for cybercriminals to exploit.

Combined, all these scams have left quite a financial impact. 74% of respondents admitted to losing more than $100 to these scams, while 30% lost more than $500. What’s more, over 2.2 billion stolen account credentials were made available on the cybercriminal underground throughout Q1 2019 alone, posing an even greater threat to users’ data.

Between all the threats stemming from these cyber-grinches and cyber-scrooges, scams have the potential to haunt users’ digital past, present, and future. Which begs the question – what should users do? They can start by first reading McAfee’s own Christmas Carol:

This Holiday Season, Watch Out for These Cyber-Grinch Tricks 6

Be on the Lookout for These Cyber-Grinch Tricks

While most users believe that cyber-scams become more prevalent during the holidays, a third don’t actually take any steps to change their online behavior. In fact, by cutting some corners to pave way for holiday fun, users may be putting themselves at more risk than they realize. While using devices and apps for tasks like holiday shopping, streaming TV shows, and food delivery services, users are sharing more personal information than ever before. By targeting these popular apps, cybercriminals can collect and store key data, including home addresses, credit card information, and account passwords that they can use for future attacks.

Another trend that’s set to hit unsavvy users this holiday season is phony gift cards, with McAfee’s Advanced Threat Research team discovering phony gift cards sold on the cybercriminal underground. However, the survey found that only 43% of respondents are aware of fake gift cards as a threat. What’s more, users are also failing to check shopping websites, with over one-third (37%) of respondents admitting that they don’t check an email sender or retailer’s website for authenticity. By not being mindful of these grinchy tricks, users open themselves up to many avenues of exploitation.

Securing Your Holiday Season

We must stop these Christmas scams from coming, but how? To help ensure a cyber-grinch doesn’t put a damper on your holiday season, check out the following security tips.

  • Never reuse passwords. With just one hack, cybercriminals can get their hands on thousands of passwords, which they can then use to try to access multiple accounts. Ensure that all of your passwords are complex and unique.
  • Go directly to the source. Instead of clicking on a link in an email, it’s always best to check directly with the source to verify an offer or shipment.
  • Browse with security protection. Use a comprehensive security solution, likeMcAfee Total Protection, which can help protect devices against malware, phishing attacks, and other threats. It includes McAfee WebAdvisor, which can help identify malicious websites.
  • Use a tool to help protect your personal information. A solution like McAfee Identity Theft Protection takes a proactive approach to help protect identities with personal and financial monitoring and recovery tools to help keep identities personal and secure.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post This Holiday Season, Watch Out for These Cyber-Grinch Tricks appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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‘Tis the Season for Cybersecurity: Stay Protected This Holiday Season

‘Tis the Season for Cybersecurity: Stay Protected This Holiday Season 7

It’s beginning to look a lot like the holiday season – and with the holidays comes various opportunities for cyber-scrooges to exploit. While users prepare for the festivities, cybercriminals look for opportunities to scam holiday shoppers with various tricks. To shed more light on how these crooks are putting a damper on user’s holiday season, McAfee surveyed over 8,000 adults over the age of 18 across multiple countries from October 10-20, 2019 on the types of scams they’ve encountered this year.

The Scams of Christmas Past

Cyber-scrooges have upped the ante over the years, using more sophisticated measures to adapt to consumers’ evolving digital lifestyles. However, scams of Christmas Past are still haunting users today, as global findings indicate that email and text phishing are still prevalent. For example, the percentage of respondents stating that they still experience email phishing ranges from 25% in India to a whopping 42% in France. Respondents stating that they still experience text phishing ranged from 21% in India to 35% in Australia.

Additionally, robocalling has seen an increase in popularity in 2019. Fifty-one percent of respondents in France stated that they still receive robocalls. The survey found that 48% of respondents in the U.S. and 32% of Australians receive robocalls, as well as 34% in Spain, and 33% in Germany claimed that they have fallen victim to robocalls.

The Scams of Christmas Present

During the holidays, cyber-scrooges are likely to further exploit scams of Christmas Present to take advantage of users’ generosity. For example, several survey respondents in the U.K., France, Germany, Spain, Australia, India, and Singapore stated that they had fallen victim to fake charity scams in 2019. Knowing that many people enjoy making donations during this time of year, cybercriminals will likely pose as a charity online as a ploy to collect financial data and money from unsuspecting users.

Since many people do a lot of their holiday shopping online, users should also beware of shipping notification scams, as respondents in the U.K., Spain, Australia, India, and Singapore have fallen victim to these scams throughout this year. This scam, along with all those of Christmas Past and Present, proves that as people continue to adopt technology into their everyday lives, they are in turn giving cybercriminals more opportunities to exploit during the holiday season.

The Scams of Christmas Future

Whether it be email phishing or fake charity scams, users must stay updated on common cyber-scrooge practices to help protect their personal and financial data. As more data and user credentials are gathered from breaches, cybercriminals are looking to take their business to the next level and leverage more advanced techniques. For example, the cybercriminal underground poses a threat to users with more than 2.2 billion stolen account credentials made available for purchase in Q1 2019. These crooks will likely continue to sell and share user data across the Dark Web for the possibility of more profit.

Cybercriminals will also leverage data collected from breaches to better understand which users to target and how they can easily target them with social engineering and AI (artificial intelligence). Most users will probably ignore a call from an unknown number, but what about a call from a family member? Cybercriminals will create more sophisticated scams by including a family member’s caller ID in the hopes of exploiting users through more personal engagement.

Attacks will not only likely grow in sophistication but in volume in the future as well. From interactive speakers to IP cameras to other internet-connected devices like thermostats and appliances — IoT devices have greatly increased the attack surface. As we see an increase in the volume of devices going into homes with a lack of security controls built-in, cybercriminals will likely focus on exploiting consumers through these gadgets. The good news? As we look ahead towards the scams of Christmas Future, we can also work to better prepare our networks and devices before we fall into cybercriminals’ traps.

Even though users believe that cyber-scams become more prevalent during the holiday season, a third don’t actually take steps to change their online behavior. To help ensure your holiday season goes off without a hitch, follow these tips to help stay secure:

  • Say so long to robocalls. Consider downloading the app Robokiller that will stop robocalls before you even pick up. The app’s block list is constantly updating, so you’re protected. Let all other unknown calls go to voicemail and never share personal details over the phone.
  • Go directly to the source. Be skeptical of emails or texts claiming to be from companies or charities with peculiar asks or messages. Instead of clicking on a link within the email or text message, it’s best to go straight to the company’s website or contact customer service.
  • Hover over links to verify the URL. If someone sends you an email with a link, hover over the link without actually clicking on it. This will allow you to see a link preview. If the URL looks suspicious, don’t interact with it and delete the email altogether.
  • Use a comprehensive security solution. Using a solution like McAfee Total Protection can help your holiday shopping spree go smoothly by providing safe web browsing, virus protection, and more.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post ‘Tis the Season for Cybersecurity: Stay Protected This Holiday Season appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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Chapter Preview: Ages 11 to 17 – From Tweens to Teens

Chapter Preview: Ages 11 to 17 – From Tweens to Teens 8

For anyone who asks what happens during the tween through teen years, the best answer is probably, “What doesn’t happen?!”

Just so you know, I’ve been there, done that, and got the T-shirt. And I survived. My kids were the first generation to grow up on social media. Like most teens in the mid-2000s, they got their first taste with MySpace and then switched to Facebook as the masses shifted there around 2009. They also got into other platforms, like Instagram, and stuck with them while others came and went. And yes, sharing almost every facet of their lives presented many challenges. I won’t get into details here as it might embarrass my kids, but suffice it to say that mistakes were made.

Being a security and privacy practitioner, I made sure there were lots of discussions on how to use these platforms safely. The early discussions centered on privacy and the permanence of data, but eventually led to security talks as the platforms were inundated with scams and other malicious activities. As you can imagine, when my kids were tweens and teens, the internet was a different place than it is today, and I’m sure it will be very different 10 to 15 years from now.

 

This chapter of “Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?” steps you through what your tween and teen face as they spend an increasing amount of time online and using connected things. It expands upon some of the topics discussed earlier in the book with more of an eye towards how those topics impact this age group, while offering advice and insights on topics that often surface at this age. We tackle some big topics too, such when to get your child a smartphone, how many children will make friends that they will only know online, cyberstalking, and the secret digital life of teens that every parent should know. This chapter packs a big punch—as it should, because these are some big years for parents and kids alike.

Gary Davis’ book, Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?, is available September 5, 2019 and can be ordered at amazon.com.

The post Chapter Preview: Ages 11 to 17 – From Tweens to Teens appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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3 Tips to Protect Yourself From the Office 365 Phishing Scams

3 Tips to Protect Yourself From the Office 365 Phishing Scams 9

Cybercriminals seem to get more and more sophisticated with their attacks, and phishing scams are no different. The McAfee Labs team has observed a new phishing campaign using a fake voicemail message to trick victims into giving up their Office 365 email credentials. During the investigation, the team has found three different phishing kits being used to exploit targets.

How exactly does this sneaky phishing scam work? It all begins when a victim receives an email stating that they’ve missed a phone call, along with a request to log into their account to access the voice message. The email also contains an attached HTML file that redirects the victim to a phishing website. This website prepopulates the victim’s email address and asks them to enter their Office 365 credentials. What’s more, the stealthy attachment contains an audio recording of someone talking, leading the victim to believe that they are listening to a legitimate voicemail.

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Once the victim enters their password, they are presented with a page stating that their login was successful. The victim is then redirected to the office.com login page, leading them to believe that everything is perfectly normal. Little do they know that their credentials have just been harvested by a cybercriminal.

While this sneaky scheme has been primarily used to target organizations, there is much to be taken away from this incident, as cybercriminals often disguise themselves as businesses to phish for user data. To protect yourself from these stealthy scams, check out the following tips:

  • Go directly to the source. Be skeptical of emails claiming to be from companies with peculiar asks or messages. Instead of clicking on a link within the email, it’s best to go straight to the company’s website to check the status of your account or contact customer service.
  • Be cautious of emails asking you to take action. If you receive an email asking you to take a certain action or download software, don’t click on anything within the message. Instead, go straight to the organization’s website. This will prevent you from downloading malicious content from phishing links.
  • Hover over links to see and verify the URL. If someone sends you an email with a link, hover over the link without actually clicking on it. This will allow you to see a link preview. If the URL looks suspicious, don’t interact with it and delete the email altogether.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post 3 Tips to Protect Yourself From the Office 365 Phishing Scams appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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Hack-ception: Benign Hacker Rescues 26M Stolen Credit Card Records

Hack-ception: Benign Hacker Rescues 26M Stolen Credit Card Records 11

There’s something ironic about cybercriminals getting “hacked back.” BriansClub, one of the largest underground stores for buying stolen credit card data, has itself been hacked. According to researcher Brian Krebs, the data stolen from BriansClub encompasses more than 26 million credit and debit card records taken from hacked online and brick-and-mortar retailers over the past four years, including almost eight million records uploaded to the shop in 2019 alone.

Most of the records offered up for sale on BriansClub are “dumps.” Dumps are strings of ones and zeros that can be used by cybercriminals to purchase valuables like electronics, gift cards, and more once the digits have been encoded onto anything with a magnetic stripe the size of a credit card. According to Krebs on Security, between 2015 and 2019, BriansClub sold approximately 9.1 million stolen credit cards, resulting in $126 million in sales.

Hack-ception: Benign Hacker Rescues 26M Stolen Credit Card Records 12

Back in September, Krebs was contacted by a source who shared a plain text file with what they claimed to be the full database of cards for sale through BriansClub. The database was reviewed by multiple people who confirmed that the same credit card records could also be found in a simplified form by searching the BriansClub website with a valid account.

So, what happens when a cybercriminal, or a well-intentioned hacker in this case, wants control over these credit card records? When these online fraud marketplaces sell a stolen credit card record, that record is completely removed from the inventory of items for sale. So, when BriansClub lost its 26 million card records to a benign hacker, they also lost an opportunity to make $500 per card sold.

What good comes from “hacking back” instances like this? Besides the stolen records being taken off the internet for other cybercriminals to exploit, the data stolen from BriansClub was shared with multiple sources who work closely with financial institutions. These institutions help identify and monitor or reissue cards that show up for sale in the cybercrime underground. And while “hacking back” helps cut off potential credit card fraud, what are some steps users can take to protect their information from being stolen in the first place? Follow these security tips to help protect your financial and personal data:

  • Review your accounts. Be sure to look over your credit card and banking statements and report any suspicious activity as soon as possible.
  • Place a fraud alert. If you suspect that your data might have been compromised, place a fraud alert on your credit. This not only ensures that any new or recent requests undergo scrutiny, but also allows you to have extra copies of your credit report so you can check for suspicious activity.
  • Consider using identity theft protection. A solution like McAfee Identify Theft Protection will help you to monitor your accounts and alert you of any suspicious activity

And, of course, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook

The post Hack-ception: Benign Hacker Rescues 26M Stolen Credit Card Records appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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Chapter Preview: Ages 2 to 10 – The Formative Years

Chapter Preview: Ages 2 to 10 – The Formative Years 13

As our children venture into toddlerhood, they start to test us a bit. They tug at the tethers we create for them to see just how far they can push us. As they grow and learn, they begin to carve out a vision of the world for themselves—with your guidance, of course, so that they can learn how to live a safe and happy life both now and as they get older.

This is true in the digital world as well.

Typically, at around age two, our kids get their first taste of playing on mommy’s or daddy’s smartphone or tablet and discover an awesome new world of devices and online activities. It’s slow at first—a couple minutes here and there—but, over time, they spend more and more of their day online. You have an opportunity when your child has their first experience with a connected device to set the tone for what’s expected. This is a deliberate teaching moment, the first of many, where you explain how to go safely online and continue to reinforce these behaviors as they grow.

Just as at home and in school, these are children’s formative years in the digital world because there’s a significant increase in their access to devices and online engagement—whether it means watching videos, playing games, interacting with educational software, or many other activities. Keeping them safe in this environment needs to be top of mind, and that includes awareness of how their initial data puddle will rapidly become a data pond during these years. We need to be aware that this pond has direct ties to our privacy, their privacy, and, ultimately, to their life in general.

This chapter of “Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?” lays out several topics that, if done in healthy and constructive way, will make your child’s digital journey much more enjoyable. Topics such as the importance of rules, online etiquette, and the notion of “the talk” as it relates to going online safely are discussed in detail, in the hope of providing a framework that will grow as your child grows.

It also looks at challenges that every parent should be aware of, such as cyberbullying and the impact of screen time on your child. It also introduces the risks associated with online gaming for those just getting started.

I can’t express strongly enough the importance of engagement with your child during the formative years. This chapter will give you plenty of ideas of how to go about it in a way that both you and your child will enjoy.

Gary Davis’ book, Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?, is available September 5, 2019 and can be ordered at amazon.com.

 

The post Chapter Preview: Ages 2 to 10 – The Formative Years appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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15 Easy, Effective Ways to Start Winning Back Your Online Privacy

NCSAM

NCSAM

Someone recently asked me what I wanted for Christmas this year, and I had to think about it for a few minutes. I certainly don’t need any more stuff. However, if I could name one gift that would make me absolutely giddy, it would be getting a chunk of my privacy back.

Like most people, the internet knows way too much about me — my age, address, phone numbers and job titles for the past 10 years, my home value, the names and ages of family members  — and I’d like to change that.

But there’s a catch: Like most people, I can’t go off the digital grid altogether because my professional life requires me to maintain an online presence. So, the more critical question is this:

How private do I want to be online?  

The answer to that question will differ for everyone. However, as the privacy conversation continues to escalate, consider a family huddle. Google each family member’s name, review search results, and decide on your comfort level with what you see. To start putting new habits in place, consider these 15 tips.

15 ways to reign in your family’s privacy

  1. Limit public sharing. Don’t share more information than necessary on any online platform, including private texts and messages. Hackers and cyber thieves mine for data around the clock.
  2. Control your digital footprint. Limit information online by a) setting social media profiles to private b) regularly editing friends lists c) deleting personal information on social profiles d) limiting app permissions someone and browser extensions e) being careful not to overshare.NCSAM
  3. Search incognito. Use your browser in private or incognito mode to reduce some tracking and auto-filling.
  4. Use secure messaging apps. While WhatsApp has plenty of safety risks for minors, in terms of data privacy, it’s a winner because it includes end-to-end encryption that prevents anyone in the middle from reading private communications.
  5. Install an ad blocker. If you don’t like the idea of third parties following you around online, and peppering your feed with personalized ads, consider installing an ad blocker.
  6. Remove yourself from data broker sites. Dozens of companies can harvest your personal information from public records online, compile it, and sell it. To delete your name and data from companies such as PeopleFinder, Spokeo, White Pages, or MyLife, make a formal request to the company (or find the opt-out button on their sites) and followup to make sure it was deleted. If you still aren’t happy with the amount of personal data online, you can also use a fee-based service such as DeleteMe.com.
  7. Be wise to scams. Don’t open strange emails, click random downloads, connect with strangers online, or send money to unverified individuals or organizations.
  8. Use bulletproof passwords. When it comes to data protection, the strength of your password, and these best practices matter.
  9. Turn off devices. When you’re finished using your laptop, smartphone, or IoT devices, turn them off to protect against rogue attacks.NCSAM
  10. Safeguard your SSN. Just because a form (doctor, college and job applications, ticket purchases) asks for your Social Security Number (SSN) doesn’t mean you have to provide it.
  11. Avoid public Wi-Fi. Public networks are targets for hackers who are hoping to intercept personal information; opt for the security of a family VPN.
  12. Purge old, unused apps and data. To strengthen security, regularly delete old data, photos, apps, emails, and unused accounts.
  13. Protect all devices. Make sure all your devices are protected viruses, malware, with reputable security software.
  14. Review bank statements. Check bank statements often for fraudulent purchases and pay special attention to small transactions.
  15. Turn off Bluetooth. Bluetooth technology is convenient, but outside sources can compromise it, so turn it off when it’s not in use.

Is it possible to keep ourselves and our children off the digital grid and lock down our digital privacy 100%? Sadly, probably not. But one thing is for sure: We can all do better by taking specific steps to build new digital habits every day.

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Be Part of Something Big

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM). Become part of the effort to make sure that our online lives are as safe and secure as possible. Use the hashtags #CyberAware, #BeCyberSafe, and #NCSAM to track the conversation in real-time.

The post 15 Easy, Effective Ways to Start Winning Back Your Online Privacy appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

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